I bought the bottle of Centenario Reposado a couple of days ago. This was before being warned off by my friend, Pancho when he told me he’d never (ever) buy any Centenario product.

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Click to enlarge photo.

A few sips into the bottle and I could see why. The reposado tastes like it was ‘rested’ (hence, reposado) in a cask that had previously been left out in the rain to fill up with pond scum, dead frog sperm, and other spoiled organic detritus. In other words it had that whole vile pukey high school Cuervo Gold thing going on.

Note: If you come visit me and I don’t like you then that is the tequila you’re going to be drinking (as I for one am not touching another drop of it).
Unbeknownst to me as to why, it is a well respected tequila here. But then again some people don’t know their ass from their elbow.

Now take the other big bottle next to it; the Puebla Viejo. It is a true and smooth workingman’s reposado. Nothing fancy, just a very respectable tequila at an affordable price. And you get a true 1000 ml unlike the aforementioned competitor that stingily metes itself out in 950 ml increments.

And like all other mid-level tequilas, Puebla Viejo sometimes sweetens the deal by throwing in a 200 ml bottle of their more expensive añejo; their Blue Label tequila.

PS – There are only three correct ways to drink a good tequila:

  • Shots that are sipped, chased by a lager beer. (Lagers finish clean and don’t coat the palate like stouts, porters, or IPAs).
  • Shots that are sipped, chased by Sangrita. (Sangrita is tomato juice, fresh squeezed lime, and a few healthy dashes of good hot sauce). The ratio is 1:1 with the Sangrita (‘little blood’) being held in its own separate shot glass.
  • A shot dumped into a tall skinny glass with 2-3 cubes of ice topped off with sparkling water. The ratio is something like 1:6-8.

PPS – A shot in Mexico isn’t like one of those dinky things served in bars in the US. A shot here is typically anywhere from 70-80 ml. That’s like 2.4 – 2.8 oz vs. 1.5 oz in the US.

I bring this up for three reasons. First, proportionality. Second, price. Like I positively cringe every time I am in a airport bar and get a teeny double mass-produced Scotch on the rocks and it costs $14. Third, the value, friendliness quotient of living in a place like Mexico that serves a premium proper size drink for less than a third the cost.

 

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